Category Archives: campaign

Caller Ring Back Tunes Conservation Campaign. A Digital Centered Approach To Speak to Young People

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Caption: A screen Grab of the MTN Uganda Caller Tunes Portal Showing Conservation Tunes.

Biodiversity Conservation in this digital age means we must adapt to the methods the young generations are moving with, otherwise, we shall be moving towards opposite directions and sending out messages using wrong forums. There is increasing need for creativity in the way conservation messages are pushed out to the people in a sense of making the messaging ‘sleek’ and also segmented for the right audiences.

In Uganda, we have about 21million unique mobile phone users which amount to 50% of the population and 14 million internet users, important to note that 70% of the population is below 35 Years. This means the relevance of speaking to the people through these devices cannot be undermined. If everyone comes to realize that loss of biodiversity affects all of us in the long run because even the telecom companies only make money when the peasant farmer has a dollar to spend on airtime.

For over 3 years I have been actively using my space as a radio and TV host to communicate information about protecting the environment in my music shows, something that my colleagues at first thought was awkward until I explained to them that, through these shows we can change behavior and attitudes of the people if we do it smartly. For now, this is something am proud of and encourage my colleagues to take up the other challenges such as HIV/ AIDS, teenage pregnancy e.tc whichever one feels comfortable with.

In my day job is I look after the East African business of Content Connect Africa which is a digital music content distribution company plugging in music content in form of Caller Ring Back Tunes, Full Track streaming and downloads through telecom networks.
Through this space, I have been able to create 30 second long Caller Ring Back Tunes (CRBT) speaking about conservation. The campaign is simply about the telecom customer choosing a CRBT that speaks about either, Forests / Wildlife / Wetlands. The CRBTs are available in either English/ Luganda languages. I hope to get government’s support to ensure the content is free for access to the telecom networks.

Listen to the CRBTs here

By James Propa

GYBN Steering Committee, Uganda

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NatureIsDoing

GYBN LAC INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN

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CALL FOR ACTION

 

The Global Youth Biodiversity Network (GYBN) is the biggest international network of youth organizations and individuals, which common goal lies on the biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of it.

Among the main goals of this network is to raise social awareness about the values of biodiversity, as well as the importance that the new generations play on the solution of this planetary crisis.  

 

The Latinamerican and Caribbean (LAC) region is home of one of the richest bio-cultural diversity of the Planet. However, it is also one of the regions with the highest deforestation rates and bio-cultural diversity loss. Through this campaign, we make a call to all those “silent heroes” that lead participatory projects and promote the conservation and sustainable use of the local biodiversity. We want to know your story and share it worldwide. We want to share your success story and be able to inspire and connect the new generations in the construction of a better/sustainable planet.

OBJECTIVE

Showcase internationally those latinamerican youth projects and initiatives that successfully promote the conservation and sustainable use of the biological diversity, as well as the shared access of the benefits of its proper use.

  • Award those initiatives that work to fulfill the Aichi targets for the LAC region.

PARTICIPANTS

  • Young professionals (17-29 years old) from Latin-American that lead their projects within the LAC region.
  • Individual and collective proposals are welcome.
  • Proposals should be submitted in spanish.

CRITERIA FOR APPLICATION

We look for projects that are developed around the following topics:

  • Conservations and sustainable use of biodiversity.
  • Capacity building and community governance.
  • Endangered species conservation.
  • Endangered ecosystems conservation.
  • Inspiring and reconnecting new generations/audiences.
  • Promotion of community participation and minorities integration.
  • Rescue of traditional knowledge.

Participants should follow the GYBN LAC Facebook page where all the information and link of the campaign will be posted. Participants must fullfill the online survey and share the requested information to the following email: earthsensesgroup@gmail.com

The stories of the winners will be posted and shared in many of the most important websites and digital platforms of Nature Conservation organizations such as the GYBN, GYBN LAC, WildVoices, CoalitionWild, IUCN-World Commission on Protected Areas, KiekariTerra, Dimension Natural, etc.

DATES

Starting Date: March 2nd

Receiving Propoasals: March 2nd  – April 2nd

Winners Announcement:  May 1st.

JURY

It will be formed by a multidisciplinary group of expert young professionals that lead conservation projects within the LAC region.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

We will choose those projects that stand for their creativity, social impact, and their effectiveness in preserve nature and inspire new generations.

The overall criteria used will be:

  • Project Impact.
  • Creativity used to solve environmental problems.
  • Engagement with the local communities.
  • What does the project do to reach the Aichi Targets?

 

The Aichi Targets (CBD) will be the main reference to evaluate the impact of each project, no matter if it is a local, regional, national or international projects.

AWARD

  • Winning projects stories will be shared in the GYBN, WildVoices, CoalitionWild and IUCN-WCPA digital media (websites, newsletters and social media).
  • A gift package will be send to each winner. The package contains:
    • “CBD in a nutshell” (GYBN book).
    • Dimension Natural (book).

Join us at the United Nations Headquaters for the World Wildlife Day 2018

GYBN in partnership with the UN Major Groups for Children and Youth is organizing a lively youth consultation on the occasion of the World Wildlife Day 2018 at the United Nations Headquarters at New York. 

We would like to invite all of you to join us online during the discussion to provide your inputs. The event will be broadcasted on Facebook Live and also have a live Twitter chat. 

Anyone who wishes to virtually join and speak during the event, please send us an email at gybninfo@gmail.com or join us directly on facebook or twitter. The discussion will be on 2nd March at 3pm following the World Wildlife Day 2018 event at the United Nations Headquarters at New York. 

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Meet our speakers for the event

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Launching Youth Biodiversity Heroes GYBN Project

On this year’s World Day of Social Justice, GYBN LAC is launching the trailer for its project, the Youth Biodiversity Heroes!


Biodiversity is under threat in some of the regions with the biggest diversity of species and cultures. In these places, anonymous environmental defenders protect biodiversity and human rights using the best of their capacity and sometimes very limited resources.
Youth Biodiversity Heroes is a project that seeks to share stories of young indigenous and peasants on the defense of the territory and the conservation of biodiversity and youth advocates for indigenous rights.
The stories will be collected in video clips in order to visualize the experiences from the Biodiversity Heroes and spread these through social media and during relevant events. The goal is to inspire more young people around the world to take action against biodiversity loss and in the fight for social justice. We also want decision makers to understand the scope of the biodiversity and human rights crisis in some of the most threatened regions in the planet.

GYBN Communities celebrating the World Wetland Day 2018

 We are very excited to share with you photos of GYBN members across the globe showcasing the wetlands they love on the this World Wetland Day. 
The World Wetland Day is celebrated every year on 2nd February and this year’s theme is Urban wetlands: prized land, not wasteland.

As cities expand and demand land increases, the tendency is to encroach on wetlands. They are degraded, filled in and built upon, yet when left intact or restored, urban wetlands make cities livable (Check out the infographics below).  


〰See how young people are taking action to play their part in saving the wetlands! 📢〰
Tuni-Condoriri Andean Mountain Range, Bolivia
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  Why I care about this wetland? Although this is not an urban wetland, the water of the city of La Paz-Bolivia depends of this wetlands to help conserve and keep the glaciers of the Tuni-Condoriri system which is the main system of water distribution for one of the highest cities in the planet.

Picture: Carmen Capriles/Reacción Climática

 

Lake Olbolosat, Kenya

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Lake Olbolosat in Central Kenya.  The guest of honor for the event was Mr. Najib Balala, the Cabinet Secretary for Tourism.
Why I care about wetlands? They are home to biodiversity, which may not be on the endangered list, but as we encroach them, we risk losing those species.
Social-economically, they are viable for tourism which employs a lot of local people through activities such as boat rowing for profit.

 

Macoun Marsh, Ottawa, CANADA
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Macoun Marsh, Ottawa, CANADA
Located in the southeast section of Beechwood Cemetery, the Macoun Marsh is a unique urban wetland named after John Macoun, a pioneering Canadian naturalist buried at Beechwood. To date, over 1,400 wildlife species have been recorded at Macoun Marsh.
The magnetic attraction of the Marsh as a unique teaching tool started in earnest in 2004. Led by science teacher Michael Léveillé, students attending the St. Laurent Academy and Jean Vanier Catholic School began to visit, photograph and document the many natural wonders of the Marsh. In so doing they not only captured local attention but the notice of the international community.
Pinegrove Productions created an educational film about the Marsh, and the Marsh spawned a number of biodiversity-related high-profile projects and events. Students from St Laurent Academy have visited various countries, including Sweden and Japan, where they have promoted the Marsh and the importance of preserving biodiversity.
Dekar Haor wetland, Bangladesh 
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Urban wetland Bogota, Colombia
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Jaboque Wetland, Bogotá – Colombia.
Jaboque wetland is the second important ecosystem and one of the biggest wetlands in Bogotá. Its name means land of abundance in Chibcha and it has been considered an ancestral place, where the Muiscas lived a thousand years ago. Sadly, this ecosystem has been distroyed by the people that live nearly and in my view this situation affected the way that Jaboque Wetland worked. First, because this wetland has been impacted by settlements and it is used like a waste dump, and secondly because some endemic animals have been disappearing due to some people doing ilegal trafic of animals in order to earn money easier.
Wetland Colombia 

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Colombia. Wetlands are important places for water birds and crocodiles, without them, these creatures would have very few places to live. Save the wetlands.- Alejandra Echeverri 

 

Quetenas, Sud Lipez- Bolivia   

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                                                              Quetenas, Sud Lipez- Bolivia                                                       
 Why I care about this wetland? The small communities of indigenous peoples in Quetena Grande and Quetena Chico in Sud Lipez- Bolivia, depend on the peat bogs, wetlands that offer food to the camelids that are the main source of income for these families. Sadly, these peat bogs are drying up because of climate change and the mining activities that have a direct impact on the water supply for these ecosystems. I have been studying the biodiversity in these wetlands and documenting traditional techniques for their restoration as an adaptation measure to climate change as part of my bachelor’s thesis. 

Picture: Mirna Fernández

Lake view park, Islamabad, Pakistan 

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 Akanyaru wetland, Rwanda

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Akanyaru wetland, Rwanda
Akanyaru wetlands are located in the south of Rwanda on the international border with Burundi. These are important in terms of local community welfare of about 100,000 people; providing goods and services to the local community such as improved ecological conditions like clean air, water, agriculture productivity, fish, traditional medicine, a source of handcrafting among others. Also, it is home of endangered bird species including Madagascar Pond Heron, Papyrus Gonolek, Papyrus Yellow Warbler, and the “Statunga”, Papyrus provide shelter of blue monkeys and snakes, whereas waterways host hippopotamus, crocodiles, and fishes.
However, it is seriously threatened by invasive species such as water hyacinth, anthropogenic activities resulting from pressures from increasing population like agricultural, hunting, burning, extraction of vegetation, uncontrolled fishing, and others, as natural phenomenon. Therefore, there is a need for enhancing it’s sustainable conservation.